OUR NEIGHBORHOODS

City of Promise is creating an ecosystem of support for children in one of Charlottesville’s most under-resourced communities. 

This focus on a targeted area represents a significant investment in the well-being and long-term thriving of the entire neighborhood. Staff members go door to door enrolling children, and neighbors know they are welcome to stop by our office, a home located right in the neighborhood. Building relationships and inviting parents into the process of uplifting the community is our way of ensuring children grow up in a safe, enriching environment, surrounded by positive role models. 

The Need

Based on data collected in 2012, before City of Promise began,

  • Our neighborhoods were the most academically challenged areas in Charlottesville, with the highest levels of juvenile justice involvement and student disengagement and failure.

  • 55% of neighborhood children were absent from school more than 10 times during the 2009-10 school year – with an average of 22 absences per child.

Neighborhood Demographics (2010 Census)

  • 991 people live in the City of Promise, 291 under age 18. 

  • There are 179 K-12 students from CoP enrolled in school, 87% of them classified as “economically disadvantaged”. 

  • About 25 babies are born to the neighborhood each year. 

  • About 64% of the residents are African American, compared to 18% in the rest of Charlottesville. 

  • 80% of neighborhood children are African American. 

  • 16 children had limited English proficiency, from eight different countries and eight languages. 

Economic Challenges

  • 87% of City of Promise students are classified as economically disadvantaged

  • 65% of the neighborhood’s families live in public housing

  • 75% of the children live in single-family households. 

  • 94% of City of Promise students are eligible for free/reduced price school lunches. 

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  • Located between downtown and UVA.

  • Home to the historic Jefferson High School.

  • Originally named Starr Hill because so many educated and wealthy black families, or "Stars" resided there.

  • A 10-acre public housing site built in 1960 to relocate residents who lived in Vinegar Hill.

  • Houses 126 families and is included as part of the 10th and Page neighborhood.

  • Named after John West, a  former slave who grew to prominence as a wealthy land owner in Charlottesville.

  • Named for an intersection near the center of the neighborhood.

  • One of Charlottesville's most compact neighborhoods, consisting of 83.86 acres.

  • City of Promise offices are located at 708 Page Street in a renovated home.